5 min read

Any marketer worth their salt knows that good marketing is all in the timing. The same can be said for email marketing, timing is everything.

But while reactive email marketing is a great way to attract captive customers, there are a few simple rules for email marketing. In your next strategy meeting, keep these tried-and-tested tips in mind.

Stay away from Mondays

“I don’t like Mondays” is more than just a song. It’s a simple fact: we’re groggy from the weekend and we invariably have tons of work to catch up on. Interestingly, Forbes cites Mondays as our most productive day in the office. That’s great news for workers, but bad news for marketers. Why would people read your email if they’re too busy getting things done?

Stick to Tuesdays and Thursdays

On the flipside, Fridays are the days in which we feel most distracted. We’re psyched up for the weekend, so it’s unlikely we’re paying attention to our emails.

According to research by Mailchimp, the best day to send an email campaign is a Tuesday or a Thursday. By this point, workers have got the mundane tasks off their desks and are more likely to engage. Don’t discount Wednesday, of course – just stay away from that weekend slump.

Hit that afternoon peak

Let’s say Thursday is the best day of a week for email open and conversion rates. Does the time of day matter?

Research suggests it does – in fact, the Mailchimp team claim that 2pm is the best time for click-through rates. Of course, this is all relative to the content and the industry, but there may just be some science behind it too.

Studies show that the “post-lunch slump” is when we are least productive. The positive to this, of course, is that we’re more likely to open emails and engage with them. Just as Mondays are too busy to notice emails, mid-afternoons are the optimum time!

What else should I bear in mind for my email campaigns?

Of course, every campaign is different, just like every industry and individual customer. The best way to engage your readers is to personalise content, which you can even automate. (You can read more on email automation here.) We would also recommend testing which day and time works best for your audience. Research and recommendations are great, but that doesn’t necessarily mean an email campaign sent on Tuesday at 2pm is going to work for your organisation.

Equally, consider the whole industry landscape when planning email campaigns. Is something likely to dwarf your campaigns, like a Black Friday sale or a media frenzy? You need to approach email timing from a macro and micro standpoint. Next time you’re planning an email series, keep these tips in mind as general guidance. Then you can start getting really technical and appealing to customer segments.